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Self Defence VS Physical Intervention

What is self-defence?

The purpose of self-defence is reducing risks to individuals becoming victims of violence. It is a key principle of the security industry that the term “self-defence is defined so that precedence is given to conflict management ensuring the personal safety of individuals, physical intervention should always be the last resort.

In some instances, individuals will be left with no option but to defend themselves by using force. IN2 Security Training offers a range of approved self-defence techniques which are easy to learn, easy to apply, effective, and, of course, lawful.

What is physical intervention?

Physical intervention is a physical response which uses force to prevent, stop or restrict the movement or actions of an attacker.

It is the use of direct or indirect force, through bodily, physical or mechanical means, to limit another person’s movement which should only be used as a last resort, when all other options have failed, are likely to fail or it’s impossible to withdraw.

Physical intervention is a physical response which uses force to prevent, stop or restrict the movement or actions of an attacker.

It is the use of direct or indirect force, through bodily, physical or mechanical means, to limit another person’s movement which should only be used as a last resort, when all other options have failed, are likely to fail or it’s impossible to withdraw.

The phrase control and restraint’ is widely used to describe some restraint techniques, but not all physical restraints fall under the control and restraint bracket. The term control and restraint are only really applied to the physical management of violence and aggression developed by the Prison Service.

Different types of physical intervention involve ‘restraint’ which occur whenever a person has their movement physically restricted by the deliberate use of force of another. Restraint can either be partial, whereby a particular movement is restricted, or it can be total, where the person is extensively immobilised.

“Under the Mental Capacity Act 2005, is defined under section 6 (4) as “using, or threatening to use, or restricting the person’s freedom of movement.”

‘Holding’ is another kind of physical intervention and can often be different from restraining, its usually seen as the least invasive form of physical response and is generally used in settings involving children, the elderly or persons with disabilities.

Stress is likely to stimulate a reaction in your sympathetic nervous system otherwise known as SMS once the SMS is activated it will have several psychological effects on the human body these include reduction of reaction time and tunnel vision.

There are three factors when combined are likely to lead to knockouts in a confrontation:

  1. Tunnel vision brought on by the stress activation of SNS
  2. Hand position attacker has his hands by his side
  3. Vulnerable stance, feet level standing square on

Potential tunnel vision means you are unlikely to see punches from a low hand position.

If you require Door Supervisor, CCTV Officer or Security Guard training, feel free to contact us for guidance.

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2 thoughts on “Self Defence VS Physical Intervention”

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